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   Hanhun Li and Chu Fang Wu Diaries, 1926-1998.

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Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Hanhun Li and Chu Fang Wu Diaries; Box and Folder; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

COinS Metadata available (e.g., for Zotero).
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Summary Information

At a Glance

Call No.:MS#1818
Bib ID:12307289 View CLIO record
Title:Hanhun Li and Chu Fang Wu Diaries, 1926-1998.
Physical description:15 linear feet (12 record storage cartons).
Access: This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least two business days in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room. This collection has no restrictions.  More information »

Arrangement

Arrangement

Arranged in two series: Series I: Chu Fang Wu; Series II: General Hanhun Li.

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Description

Scope and Content

An extensive collection of diaries in Chinese.

Series I: Chu Fang Wu

Series II: General Han Hun Li

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Using the Collection

Offsite

Access Restrictions

 This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least two business days in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

      offsite requestMore information and link to off-site request form

This collection has no restrictions.

Restrictions on Use

Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. The RBML maintains ownership of the physical material only. Copyright remains with the creator and his/her heirs. The responsibility to secure copyright permission rests with the patron.

Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Hanhun Li and Chu Fang Wu Diaries; Box and Folder; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

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About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries. Rare Book and Manuscript Library; machine readable finding aid created by Columbia University Libraries Digital Library Program Division

Processing Information

Papers processed, 11/2/2016 by Michael Wang and Patrick Lawlor

Machine readable finding aid generated from MARC-AMC source via XSLT conversion January 17, 2017 Finding aid written in English.
    2017-01-17 File created.

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Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

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Genre/Form

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
DiariesPortalCLIOArchiveGRID

Subjects

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
China--Politics and government--1912-1949.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
China.--Lu jun--Officers.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Governors--China.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Li, Hanhun, 1895-PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Wu, Ch Fang.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID

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History / Biographical Note

Biograpical Note

Li Hunhun:

Li Hanhun (traditional Chinese: 李漢魂; simplified Chinese: 李汉魂; pinyin: Li Hanhun; 7 October 1895-30 June 1987), courtesy name Bohao (伯豪) was a Chinese (Kuomintang) general from Wuchuan, Guangdong. He participated in the Northern Expedition and Second Sino-Japanese War, when he served as chair of the Guangdong provincial government for six years. In 1949, he went to the United States, where, in 1987, he died in New York. Former Harvard Professor Frederick Pei Li was his son.

Chu Fang Wu:

Chu Fang Wu (1911-1999) was born into a feudal family at the time of China's transition from Empire to Republic. Being the only child of a father who had little interest in a daughter and a mother who died during her infancy, her life story was one of relentless striving for a place in society for herself and for those she was in a position to help, especially children and women. As a teenager, she defied the wishes of her father and insisted on getting an education. When Republic of China General Han Hun Li, a commander of the famed Fourth Army, was stationed in Ichang, Hubei where she resided in 1929, he proposed to her, asking her what she would wish as his wife; “obtaining a college education” was her reply. She recorded her life with him in war-time China, and afterwards in America, in a diary from 1939 to 1987.

As a young army officer's wife, she organized literacy and home economics classes for other officers' wives while her husband was chief civil-military administrator in Shaoguan, Guangdong. With a third child on the way, she entered the Sun Yatsen University College of Agriculture in Guangzhou (Canton) with the inaugural group of eight female students, receiving her bachelor's degree in 1941.

The Sino-Japanese War exploded in 1937. With her husband recalled to active duty, Chu Fang Wu began organizing the officers' wives to raise funds in Hong Kong for medical supplies and winter wear for the soldiers in the frontline. (His wife's relief activities at the front where Li was fighting was noted in Frieda Utley's book China at War.)

As the wife of the Governor of Guangdong (1939-1945), she led the rescue operation of over 20,000 refugee children from occupied territories and war zones. Seven Children's Homes and Schools were established in succession to accommodate the refugee children, ages 6-18, each nurturing and educating over 1,000 children at any given time. Also founded were a normal school, vocational high schools, and the Lixin High School for gifted students. Factories were established to accommodate those older than 18 years. The children called her Mother, even decades later when many of them have become professors, journalists, engineers, teachers, military officers, in China, Taiwan, and abroad.

She also founded the Women's Brigade, which accommodated over 1,000 young women who lost their soldier husbands in service of their country. The women learned literacy, farming, and cottage industry skills, and received military training towards civil defense.

Chu-Fang Wu was also an elected member of the first National Assembly of the Republic of China.

After the Communist takeover of China in 1949, General Li and Mrs. Li settled in New York City. Having scarce financial resources to support the four children they brought with them and then a fifth born in America, she resolved to take up one of the few career options open at that time to Chinese immigrants with limited English, that of a restaurateur. She first learned the mechanics of operating a restaurant in a “chop suey house” type of place, the Good Will, in NYC's Washington Heights, which she went into with several partners experienced in the business. Then in 1955 she opened her own restaurant in White Plains, NY, China Garden, by which she eventually broke new ground in Chinese cuisine in America. By means of innovative menus and presentations, and by working personally to educate customers to the appreciation of gourmet Chinese dining, she brought this restaurant to great heights of recognition in the New York City area.

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