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   National Story Project Records 1998-2002.

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Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); National Story Project Records; Box and Folder; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

COinS Metadata available (e.g., for Zotero).

Summary Information

Abstract

A collection of over 5,000 true short stories written as submissions for National Public Radio's (NPR) National Story Project, which was a segment on Weekend All Things Considered. The National Story Project was created and supervised by American author, Paul Auster.

At a Glance

Call No.:MS#1559
Bib ID:7268954 View CLIO record
Creator(s):Auster, Paul, 1947-
Title:National Story Project Records 1998-2002.
Physical description:7.5 linear ft. (6 record storage cartons)
Language(s): Material is in English.
Access: This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least twenty-four (24) hours in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room. This collection has no restrictions.  More information »

Arrangement

Arrangement

This collection is arranged in 2 series

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Description

Scope and Content

This collection contains over 5,000 submissions to the National Story Project, a program that aired from 1999 November until 2001 July on National Public Radio's Weekend All Things Considered. The collection primarily contains printed e-mail submissions and letters received through the mail. In addition to the stories, some participants sent cassette tapes or CDs of themselves reading their stories or performing music to accompany the submission. Also included are books, photographs, newspapers, magazines, pamphlets and other materials either meant to verify their submission as true, add context to their submission, or to show other formats that their submissions had appeared in previously.

Series I: E-mail Submissions to the National Story Project, 1998-2001

This subseries contains print outs of National Story Project submissions that were entered electronically through e-mail.

Series II: Mailed Submissions to the National Story Project, 1999-2002

This subseries contains National Story Project submissions that were entered by mail. These submissions contain stories as well as accompanying materials such as audio cassette tapes, CDs, photographs, newspapers, magazines, and other types of materials.

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Using the Collection

Offsite

Access Restrictions

 This collection is located off-site. You will need to request this material at least twenty-four (24) hours in advance to use the collection in the Rare Book and Manuscript Library reading room.

      offsite requestMore information and link to off-site request form

This collection has no restrictions.

Restrictions on Use

Single photocopies may be made for research purposes. The RBML maintains ownership of the physical material only. Copyright remains with the creator and his/her heirs. The responsibility to secure copyright permission rests with the patron.

Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); National Story Project Records; Box and Folder; Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

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About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Libraries. Rare Book and Manuscript Library; machine readable finding aid created by Columbia University Libraries Digital Library Program Division

Processing Information

Papers processed 5/24/2011 Ellen Reece, Pratt 2011

Finding aid written 04/15/2011 Ellen Reece, Pratt 2011

Machine readable finding aid generated from MARC-AMC source via XSLT conversion May 25, 2011 Finding aid written in English.
    2011-05-25 xml document instance created by Carrie Hintz

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Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Genre/Form

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
Short Stories.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID

Subjects

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
Auster, Paul, 1947-PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
National Public Radio (U.S.).PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
National Story Project (U.S.).PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Oral history.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Storytelling.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
United States--Biography--Anecdotes.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
United States--Social life and customs--20th century--Anecdotes.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Weekend all things considered (Radio program).PortalCLIOArchiveGRID

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History / Biographical Note

Historical Note

The National Story project began in 1999 after American author, Paul Auster, read a selection from his novel Timbuktu on NPR's Weekend All Things Considered. Auster was asked to return to the program by its then host, Daniel Zwerdling, to perform another reading at a future date. Auster answered with the conditional response that he would be willing to return, but only if he could read other people's stories and not just his own.

The National Story Project began taking submissions from listeners in 1999 October through both e-mail and mail. The guidelines for the stories were that they had to be no more than three pages in length and that the submissions relayed a true event. The selected stories would then be edited or rewritten, if needed, by Auster and his team. The National Story Project aired on Weekend All Things Considered the first Saturday of each month from 1999 November until 2001 July and during that time received over 5,000 submissions from all over the United States on a wide variety of topics and from people of varying ages, gender and backgrounds.

After the National Story Project ended, Auster selected his favorite submissions and compiled them for a book entitled I Thought My Father Was God: And Other True Tales from NPR's National Story Project. The collection was published in 2002 by Picador, a Macmillan Publishing imprint.

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