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   Historical Subject Files, 1870s-2012. [Bulk Dates: 1968-1972].

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Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Historical Subject Files, Box and Folder; University Archives, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

COinS Metadata available (e.g., for Zotero).

Summary Information

Abstract

The Historical Subject Files Collection documents Columbia University history and related topics from 1754 to the present. The collection includes articles, booklets, clippings, correspondence, memoranda, non-photographic images, notes, pamphlets, posters, press releases, programs and reports.

At a Glance

Call No.:UA#002
Bib ID:5694076 View CLIO record
Creator(s):Columbia University. University Archives.
Title:Historical Subject Files, 1870s-2012. [Bulk Dates: 1968-1972].
Physical description:171.36 linear feet (408 document boxes).
Language(s):In English
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Arrangement

Arrangement

This collection is arranged in twenty-three series.

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Description

Scope and Content

The Historical Subject Files documents Columbia University history and related topics from 1754 to the present. The collection consists of documents in various paper formats, including: articles, booklets, clippings, correspondence, memoranda, non-photographic images, notes, pamphlets, posters, press releases, printed matter, programs, and reports. Because documents are continually added to each series, the date range for each series and the entire collection is noted very generally, by decades (e.g., 1960s-1990s). When the contents of a folder refer to a one time event, the specific year of that event is used instead of the more general dating scheme.

All series refer to the subject's relationship or association with Columbia University except for Series XXIII (New York City) which is a collection of clippings, brochures and pamphlets that refers to subjects associated mostly (or only) with the city surrounding the University.

Please see series descriptions in the contents list for additional information about individual series.

Series I: Academics and Research, 1750s-2000s

This series is composed of newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, and other printed matter regarding the various schools, departments, institutes, and centers that are currently or were previously associated with Columbia University. Also includes files on other topics related to academics and research such as admissions, enrollment, academic calendars, curriculum, and syllabi. The files are arranged alphabetically.

Series II: Administration, 1780s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, reports, budgets, pamphlets and other printed matter documenting the various aspects of Columbia University’s administration. It is divided into the following seven sub-series. Subseries II.1: General Subseries II.2: Finance Subseries II.3: Office of the President Subseries II.4: Office of the Provost Subseries II.5: Office of the Secretary Subseries II.6: University Trustees Subseries II.7: University Senate

The files are arranged alphabetically within each Subseries.

Series III: Alumni, 1750s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, programs, and other printed matter relating to the alumni groups for both the university as a whole as well as individual schools, reunions, and other alumni related activities. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series IV: Athletics, 1850s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, programs, brochures, and other printed matter relating to Columbia's sports teams and sports-related activities. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series V: Awards, 1890s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, programs and other printed matter concerning awards and prizes offered by Columbia University and its various schools. Topics include the history of various awards and prizes, names of recipients and the award regulations. Folders are arranged alphabetically and chronologically.

Series VI: Community Affairs, 1890s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, reports and other printed matter relating to Columbia's programs and interactions with its neighbors in Harlem and Morningside Heights, community. Also includes information about neighborhood institutions such as Cathedral of St. John the Divine, the West End Café, and Riverside Church. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series VII: Demonstrations, 1920s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, flyers, and other printed matter concerned with demonstrations and protests of Columbia students, faculty, and staff. Demonstrations address many national and international events, including South Africa divestment, Clarence Thomas Supreme Court hearings, civil rights and abortion. Although there is one folder on the topic of the 1968 crisis on campus, most information about the 1968 demonstrations and subsequent take over of campus buildings can be found in a stand alone collection, University Protest and Activism Collection, 1958-1999 (bulk dates 1968-1972) . Folders are arranged alphabetically and chronologically.

Series VIII: Events, 1810s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, programs, seating charts and other printed matter relating to various events held by and at Columbia University. This series is divided into two subseries. Subseries 1 consist of a wide array of events while Subseries 2 consists solely of annual lectures and lecture series. Folders are arranged alphabetically and chronologically in each subseries.

Series IX: Faculty, 1850s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, reports and other printed matter related to organizations and issues of importance to faculty members at Columbia University. This series is divided into two subseries. Subseries 1 consists of general topics related to faculty issues while Subseries 2 consists solely of information regarding named professorships established at Columbia University. Folders are arranged alphabetically in each subseries.

Series X: Fellowships and Scholarships, 1880s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases and printed matter regarding the numerous fellowships and scholarships offered by Columbia University and its various schools. This series includes information on the Pulitzer Prizes. Files arranged alphabetically and chronologically.

Series XI: Fundraising, 1880s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, brochures, printed matter and reports addressing the various aspects of fundraising efforts by Columbia University, its schools and numerous alumni associations. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XII: Human Resources, 1910s-2000s

Newspaper clippings, press releases, announcements and reports related to working at Columbia University, benefits offered to employees, and various University policies. This series includes files of information about the various unions established and operating at Columbia. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XIII: Information Services, 1900s-2000s

Newspaper clippings, press releases, announcements and printed matter concerning email, telephone service, mail service, campus security, computer issues and Academic Information Services. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XIV: Libraries, 1790s-2000s

Newspaper clippings, press releases, printed matter, reports, newsletters, brochures, reports and announcements related to various aspects of Columbia University's libraries and the School of Library Service, which was closed in 1992. This series is divided into three subseries: Subseries XIV.1: General Subseries XIV.2: Individual Libraries and Collections Subseries XIV.3: School of Library Service (SLS)

The folders in each subseries are arranged alphabetically.

Series XV: Publications, 1860s-2000s

Newspaper clippings, press releases and printed matter relating to numerous university publications and the organizations behind these publications. Actual issues of many of these university publications are found in this series as well. Also featured in this series is information about Columbia University Press, the Spectator Publishing Company, and the University Publications Office. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XVI: Public Relations, 1750s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases and printed matter relating to how the University is portrayed in the media, advertising and other public arenas. Other topics in this series include visitors, national rankings, legal cases against Columbia, and the News Office. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XVII: Religious Life, 1800s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, programs, printed matter, flyers and announcements related to various religious activities and organizations at Columbia. The series is dominated by Christian and Jewish activities (especially activities held at St. Paul's Chapel), though other religious groups, such as Islam, are documented as well. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series XVIII: Social Issues, 1880s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, flyers and other printed matter related to Columbia's responses to major social issues such as AIDS, discrimination, anti-semitism, Apartheid, politics, Black-Jewish relations, and various national and international disasters. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series XIX: Student Life, 1810s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, flyers, printed matter, programs, correspondence and brochures concerning various aspects of student life at Columbia University. Files contain information about specific student clubs, groups, events and activities of Columbia students. Also contains information about minority students. This series is divided into the following four subseries: Subseries XIX.1: General Subseries XIX.2: Fine and Performing Arts Subseries XIX.3: Fraternities and Sororities Subseries XIX.4: Political Organizations

The folders in each subseries are arranged alphabetically.

Series XX: Student Services, 1910s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, correspondence, flyers and other printed matter concerning student employment opportunities, residence halls, dining services, enrollment, academic calendars, registration and the office of student activities. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XXI: Symbols, 1780s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, correspondence, sheet music, brochures, drawings and printed matter documenting the various university symbols. Symbols include the seal and shield, songs, the Columbia lion mascot, the king's crown, Alma Mater statue, and the origins of Columbia's name. Files are arranged alphabetically.

Series XXII: Women at Columbia, 1870s-2000s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, press releases, reports, memoranda, flyers and other printed matter related specifically to women students, faculty and alumnae of Columbia University. Topics also include academic areas of study (e.g., centers, institutes, and programs), women's social issues (e.g., sexual harassment, feminism), affirmative action, and the history of co-education at Columbia. Folders are arranged alphabetically.

Series XXIII: New York City History, 1930s-1960s

Newspaper and magazine clippings, brochures, pamphlets and assorted printed matter related to New York City history, places and events outside the realm of Columbia University. The materials in this series are in two document boxes and not housed in folders. One box contains clippings and the other contains brochures and pamphlets.

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Using the Collection

Preferred Citation

Identification of specific item; Date (if known); Historical Subject Files, Box and Folder; University Archives, Rare Book and Manuscript Library, Columbia University Library.

Finding aid in repository; folder level control.

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About the Finding Aid / Processing Information

Columbia University Archives; machine readable finding aid created by Columbia University Libraries Digital Library Program Division

Processing Information

This collection was processed by Jennifer Comins, Shelley Hayreh (BC 2008), Jocelyn Wilk, Elena Locascio, and Elizabeth Nolte (GSAS 2009).

Finding aid writtten by Jocelyn Wilk, 2009.

Machine readable finding aid generated from MARC-AMC source via XSLT conversion October 29, 2009 Finding aid written in English.
    2009-10-29 xml document instance created by Carrie Hintz

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Subject Headings

The subject headings listed below are found in this collection. Links below allow searches at Columbia University through the Archival Collections Portal and through CLIO, the catalog for Columbia University Libraries, as well as ArchiveGRID, a catalog that allows users to search the holdings of multiple research libraries and archives.

All links open new windows.

Genre/Form

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
Clippings.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Correspondence.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Ephemera.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Menus.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Press Releases.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Programs.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID

Subjects

HeadingCUL Archives:
Portal
CUL Collections:
CLIO
Nat'l / Int'l Archives:
ArchiveGRID
Columbia College (Columbia University).PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy--Athletics.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy--Awards.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy--Employees.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy--Periodicals.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy.--Office of University Development and Alumni Relations.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia Univeristy.--Press.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Administration.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Alumni and Alumnae.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Buildings.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Curricula.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Faculty.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Finance.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Football.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Funds and Scholarships.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Graduate Faculties.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--History--18th century.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--History--19th century.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--History--20th century.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--History--21st century.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--History.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Religion.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Societies.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Songs and music.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Theatre.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University--Trustees.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.--Libraries.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.--Office of Public Affairs.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.--School of Engineering and Applied Science.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.--School of Law.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Columbia University.--Students.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Education, higher--New York (State)--New York.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
New York (N.Y.)PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Students--Political activity.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID
Women in education--New York (State)--New York.PortalCLIOArchiveGRID

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History / Biographical Note

Historical Note

Columbia University, the oldest institution of higher learning in the state of New York and the fifth oldest in the United States, was founded in 1754 as King's College by royal charter of King George II of England. Samuel Johnson, the College's first president, held the first classes in October 1754 in the vestry room of the Trinity Church schoolhouse on lower Broadway. There were eight students in this first class. This room housed classes until 1760 when the school moved to a building on Park Place in downtown Manhattan, near the present site of City Hall. Classes were suspended during the American Revolution in 1776 and the building was used as a barrack and hospital for both British and American troops. When instruction resumed in 1784, King's College changed its name to Columbia, in keeping with the contemporary political climate.

Classes continued in the Park Place campus building until 1857, when, to accommodate its continuing expansion, the college moved to 49th Street and Madison Avenue. It remained at this site for forty years, until 1897, when the university was moved by President Seth Low to the more spacious Morningside Heights campus, designed as an urban academic village by McKim, Mead, and White.

During the last half of the nineteenth century, Columbia rapidly assumed the shape of a modern university. The Columbia School of Law was founded in 1858. The country's first mining school, a precursor of today's Fu Foundation School of Engineering and Applied Science, was established in 1864 and awarded the first Columbia Ph.D. in 1875. Barnard College for women became affiliated with Columbia in 1889; the medical school came under the aegis of the University in 1891, followed by Teachers College in 1893. In the 1880s, Columbia developed graduate faculties in political science, philosophy, and pure science, establishing Columbia as one of the nation's earliest center for graduate education. In 1896, the Trustees authorized the use of yet another new name, Columbia University, and today the institution is officially known as Columbia University in the City of New York.

During the presidency of Nicholas Murray Butler (1902-1945), Columbia emerged as a preeminent national center for educational innovation and scholarly achievement. The study of the sciences flourished along with the liberal arts. Franz Boas founded the modern science of anthropology at Columbia in the early decades of the twentieth century; the School of Journalism was established by bequest of Joseph Pulitzer in 1912; a course of study of original masterworks for undergraduates was created which ultimately developed into what is now know as the Core Curriculum; and atomic research was conducted by Columbia faculty, bringing the Physics Department to international prominence. In 1946, the School of International Affairs (now the School of International and Public Affairs) was founded marking the beginning of intensive growth in international relations as a major scholarly focus of the University.

Columbia continued to expand in the ensuing decades -- improving both its physical plant and creating new programs and infrastructure for a growing campus and community. Today it is considered one of the pre-eminent institutions of higher learning in the country and in the world.

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